Illustrative General Questions At
The Facility Level

Access To and
Control Over Assets

  1. What is the average amount of time health care providers spend explaining procedures and treatment regimens to men vs. women?
  2. What amount of time do providers spend with women and men for the same or comparable conditions? Are men and women treated by the same category of health care provider for comparable conditions?
  3. What is the amount of time men and women spend in the hospital for similar conditions? Do men or women spend less time, and why? For example, do women leave the health facility sooner than expected after giving birth? Why?
  4. How and when is information about men’s and women’s access to services collected and analyzed?
  5. Are there male and female health care providers to fulfill the client’s preferred sex of provider?
  6. Are commodities available for both female and male health needs, according to demand?
  7. Are there equal opportunities for male or female health care workers to be employed and promoted?
  8. Do men and women receive equal pay for equal work, equitable fringe benefits, preferred postings, and equal opportunity to work the same number of hour and shifts?
  9. Do male or female health care workers have the same opportunities for training in ANC, FP, emergency obstetric and newborn care, active management of the third stage of labor, postpartum care, and other skills, locally, nationally, and internationally?
  10. Do either male or female health care providers report that there were trainings on these or other topics that they wanted to attend, but were not able to? Why couldn’t they attend (e.g., given on a day off when they had family or other obligations, not selected, too far away, couldn’t afford the cost of the course or other associated costs)?
  11. Are there enough women midwives and physicians to care for women who prefer female health care providers?
  12. Are there enough male nurses and physicians to counsel women’s partners on FP and HIV should they desire a man to speak to instead of a woman?
  13. Are women or men denied promotions or other benefits because of assumptions about competing household obligations or lack of autonomy?

Beliefs and Perceptions
(Norm)

  1. How do ideas about men’s and women’s proper behavior affect their access to services and treatment by health care providers? How do these attitudes affect how they interact with men, women, boys, and girls?
  2. How do the attitudes of health care professionals differ toward women vs. men?
  3. What are providers’ beliefs about gender differences and equality? In general? In the health care work place? For their patients? How does this affect their treatment of patients?
  4. What are supervisors and administrators attitudes about sending men and women providers for training? In the district? Outside the district? Overseas?
  5. Do factors related to gender influence promotion decisions?

Practices and Participation
(Roles & Responsibilities)

  1. Are men’s or women’s health needs prioritized or disregarded? Is triage affected by the sex of a person? For example, are women with obstetric complications treated with the same speed as men with injuries from car accidents or occupational injuries?
  2. How well do health workers respond to men’s and women’s different health needs?
  3. Are men and women treated differently by:
    • Providers who are women?
    • Providers who are men?
  4. Do women or men experience harassment and assault at their workplaces, and in what form and frequency?
  5. How and when is information about men’s and women’s different experiences with the services collected and analyzed?
  6. What is the proportion of men and women in management? Supervisors of each category of health workers, staff, and volunteers?
  7. How does counseling promote or discourage men’s and women’s personal choice about uptake of services or compliance with treatment, or use of contraceptive methods?
  8. How are men and women health care workers involved in planning and policy formulation in the facility? Do men and women with equal training and seniority have equal decision-making and influence?
  9. What would a nurse or midwife do if s/he observes a doctor’s error or failure to follow biosecurity protocols? If the nurse is a woman and the doctor is a man? If the nurse is a man and the doctor a man? If both the nurse and the doctor are women? If the nurse is a man and the doctor a woman?

Laws, Policies,
and Institutions

  1. Does the organization, spatial arrangement, and client flow in the facility affect men and women differently, making them more or less likely to use the services? Providing them more or less privacy?
  2. Is health information at the facility level disaggregated by sex and age and comparatively analyzed for decision-making?
  3. Is there any difference in availability of drugs and supplies (e.g. vasectomy vs. oral contraceptive pills) that are routinely used for men’s health compared to women’s health?
  4. Are men and women treated equally with regard to confidentiality (nondisclosure) of health information?
  5. Does the health facility have a code of conduct and reporting mechanisms for that cover sexual harassment and assault? Disrespectful treatment?
  6. As a consequence of facility protocols and procedures, do men or women experience stigma around different diseases? What about differences between groups of men and women, based on things like marital status or sexual orientation?
    • HIV
    • Malaria
    • TB
    • STI’s
  7. How many women and men on staff at the facility have the power to shape policies?
  8. Which of the facility-level policies promote or discourage male and female clients’ personal choices about uptake of services or compliance with treatment? How do they affect men’s and women’s choices and access to services or treatment? For example, do policies state that tubal ligation is only available to women with at least two children? Do facility policies support the disclosure that a woman is using contraception to her husband, without first consulting her?
  9. Are staff trained on gender equality and human rights, and how is the training offered often?
  10. Is there a national policy on gender equality?
  11. Is there a human resource policy at the district and facility levels on gender equality and/or non-discrimination based on gender?
  12. Are any of the workplace policies discriminatory against men or women?
Illustrative Questions For
Maternal & Newborn Health At The Facility Level (client-provider Interactions)

Access To and
Control Over Assets

  1. Are information, education and communication (IEC) materials equally accessible to men and women clients? Why or why not (i.e., low literacy levels of women, illustrations do not include men and women equitably, or sex- specific pronouns are used in exclusionary ways)?
  2. Do the illustrations stereotype men’s and women’s roles (i.e., women are caregivers; women are portrayed as responsible for illness of other family members, men are only portrayed as those in need of care or as doctors and administrators)?
  3. Do men have access to health education and at times they are available?
  4. During ANC do providers ask a woman if there are any reasons that would prevent her from delivering at a health facility; if she is able to decide for herself where to deliver; and if not, whether she can bring the decision-maker to her next appointment?

Beliefs and Perceptions
(Norm)

  1. Do men and women have a preference for a health care practitioner of the same sex?
  2. What are the beliefs held by women that prevent a woman from:
    • Using FP?
    • Attending ANC?
    • Delivering at a health care facility?
    • Breastfeeding?
  3. What are the beliefs held by men that prevent a woman from:
    • Using FP?
    • Attending ANC?
    • Delivering at a health care facility?
  4. Are there beliefs that would discourage men from getting an HIV test, seeking services for an STI, agreeing to use condoms or supporting his partner to use other types of FP?
  5. What is considered respectful treatment, respectively, by women and men health workers of:
    • Female clients or companions?
    • Male clients or companions?
  6. Do providers believe that a woman should not receive FP until she has a boy child, or that she should not receive a FP method without her husband’s consent? Do health care workers believe men/boys and women/girls should receive the same attention and quality of care? Do health care workers believe men/boys and women/girls should receive the same attention and quality of care?

Practices and Participation
(Roles & Responsibilities)

  1. Do health workers ask women who decides:
    • If she can go to the health facility?
    • To bring her child to a health facility for well child or sickcare?
    • Where she will deliver?
  2. Are there incidents of disrespectful care by male or female providers in the facility toward:
    • Female clients or companions?
    • Male client or companions?
    • Female health workers?
  3. Are women discriminated against for being poor, of a particular ethnic group, for being young or old, for the timing of her arrival (too early or too late in labor), or for coming in with a miscarriage or abortion?
  4. Do health care providers explain to the woman and her companion progress and procedures during labor, delivery, and postpartum?
  5. Do health care providers treat women who give birth to a boy differently than those who give birth to a girl?
  6. How does counseling promote or discourage men and women’s personal choices about uptake of services or compliance with choices of method?

Laws, Policies,
and Institutions

  1. Is there a national policy on gender equality?
  2. Are there guidelines for the health sector response on GBV?
  3. Are there protocols at the facility level about screening for and responding to GBV?
  4. Are there policies and guidelines for
    inviting women’s partners for:

    • ANC
    • HIV counseling and testing during ANC
    • FP
  5. Are there guidelines for inviting a woman to bring a companion during delivery at the health facility?
  6. Do hours or the layout of services exclude women, men, or adolescent boys or girls from attending ANC, FP, delivery, or postpartum care?
Next Section: The District & Program Levels >

Resources

The Community Score Card (CSC): A generic guide for implementing CARE’s CSC process to improve quality of services.

CARE International.

2013. Atlanta: CARE:
http://bit.ly/1PdB2Ji

Authors: CARE International. Date: 2013

Organization: CARE International.

URL: http://bit.ly/1PdB2Ji

Health Area: General

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The toolkit provides guidance on how to use the Community Score Card, a participatory tool for assessing, monitoring and evaluating services. In particular, it will allow users to measure the quality, efficiency, and accountability of their services. It is intended to stimulate discussions between users and service providers. Communities using this tool are engaged through focus groups that are highly interactive.

Targeted Users: This tool can be used by government institutions, nongovernmental orgnanizations, community-based structures such as health centers and village committees, and community-based organizations.

How to apply the tool? This tool allows service users to provide feedback on the performance of systems. It also gives service providers the to opportunity to learn from beneficiaries about how services can be improved in a way to meet the beneficiaries’ needs

The Gender Audit Handbook.

Morris, Patricia.

2010. Washington, DC: InterAction.
http:// bit.ly/21iJc6U

Authors: Morris, Patricia. Date: 2010

Organization: InterAction

URL: http:// bit.ly/21iJc6U

Health Area: All

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The handbook offers a step-by-step process for conducting a gender audit of an organization. It provides the tools, resources, and information needed to conduct each step of the gender audit. The audit examines gender integration in the policies, social relations, leadership, and procedures of an organization, as well as attention to gender inequalities in the organization’s programs.

Targeted Users:

How to apply the tool? The tool was developed to be used at an organizational level. The questions relate both to gender integration in programs and in the organization’s policies and procedures. The tool provides the necessary instructions and data collection instruments to conduct a gender audit. The questions on the questionnaire and for the focus group discussions can be adapted for other types of gender analyses.

How Gender-Sensitive Are Your HIV and FP Services.

Institute for International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF),Western Hemisphere Region.Reproductive Health.

2002. New York: IPPF/WRO.
http://bit.ly/1TgVN5q

Authors: Institute for International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF),Western Hemisphere Region.Reproductive Health. Date: 2002

Organization: International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region

URL: http://bit.ly/1TgVN5q

Health Area: HIV

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The HIV/Gender continuum self-assessment tool is designed to help organizations incorporate gender sensitive approaches into their HIV programs through a rights-based approach to sexual and reproductive health. It is designed to address specific issues such as social and biological factors that put women at risk for contracting HIV, women’s decision-making and negotiation skills on condom use with their sexual partners, providers and counselors’ ability to articulate connections between HIV and gender-based violence, and the extent to which providers and counselors refer women to women’s rights groups. It includes a series of score cards that organizations can use to assess if their organization falls into a non-gender-sensitive program, a somewhat gender-sensitive program, or an ideal gender-sensitive program.

Targeted Users: This tool is aimed at organizations implementing HIV programs.

How to apply the tool? Organizations implementing HIV programs can use this tool to assess and then develop an action plan for increasing the gender-sensitivity of their program.

Authors: CARE International. Date: 2013

Organization: CARE International.

URL: http://bit.ly/1PdB2Ji

Health Area: General

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The toolkit provides guidance on how to use the Community Score Card, a participatory tool for assessing, monitoring and evaluating services. In particular, it will allow users to measure the quality, efficiency, and accountability of their services. It is intended to stimulate discussions between users and service providers. Communities using this tool are engaged through focus groups that are highly interactive.

Targeted Users: This tool can be used by government institutions, nongovernmental orgnanizations, community-based structures such as health centers and village committees, and community-based organizations.

How to apply the tool? This tool allows service users to provide feedback on the performance of systems. It also gives service providers the to opportunity to learn from beneficiaries about how services can be improved in a way to meet the beneficiaries’ needs

Authors: Morris, Patricia. Date: 2010

Organization: InterAction

URL: http:// bit.ly/21iJc6U

Health Area: All

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The handbook offers a step-by-step process for conducting a gender audit of an organization. It provides the tools, resources, and information needed to conduct each step of the gender audit. The audit examines gender integration in the policies, social relations, leadership, and procedures of an organization, as well as attention to gender inequalities in the organization’s programs.

Targeted Users:

How to apply the tool? The tool was developed to be used at an organizational level. The questions relate both to gender integration in programs and in the organization’s policies and procedures. The tool provides the necessary instructions and data collection instruments to conduct a gender audit. The questions on the questionnaire and for the focus group discussions can be adapted for other types of gender analyses.

Authors: Institute for International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF),Western Hemisphere Region.Reproductive Health. Date: 2002

Organization: International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region

URL: http://bit.ly/1TgVN5q

Health Area: HIV

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The HIV/Gender continuum self-assessment tool is designed to help organizations incorporate gender sensitive approaches into their HIV programs through a rights-based approach to sexual and reproductive health. It is designed to address specific issues such as social and biological factors that put women at risk for contracting HIV, women’s decision-making and negotiation skills on condom use with their sexual partners, providers and counselors’ ability to articulate connections between HIV and gender-based violence, and the extent to which providers and counselors refer women to women’s rights groups. It includes a series of score cards that organizations can use to assess if their organization falls into a non-gender-sensitive program, a somewhat gender-sensitive program, or an ideal gender-sensitive program.

Targeted Users: This tool is aimed at organizations implementing HIV programs.

How to apply the tool? Organizations implementing HIV programs can use this tool to assess and then develop an action plan for increasing the gender-sensitivity of their program.

Manual to Evaluate Quality of Care from a Gender Perspective.

International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region.

2000. New York: IPPF/WHR.
http://bit.ly/1lkoToG

Authors: International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region. Date: 2000

Organization: International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region.

URL: http://bit.ly/1lkoToG

Health Area: Reproductive health/FP

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This manual will assist reproductive health institutions to evaluate the quality of care of their services from a gender perspective. This manual provides guidance on assessing the level of gender integration in the institution, identify ways to better integrate gender into the institutions, and build staff’s capacity to use a gender perspective in their delivery of reproductive health services. This manual can be used to identify the extent to which gender is integrated into the system and then develop a plan of action to better integrate gender into identified areas. The annexes of this manual includes six tools: 1) a client exit interview guide; 2) a service provider interview guide; 3) a service provider document review guide; and guides for 4) observation of physical aspects of the clinic; 5) client reception; and 6) consultation and counseling. Annex 8 includes a list of indicators that can be used to assess the quality of care in a reproductive health institution from a gender perspective.

Targeted Users: Evaluation teams can use this manual to conduct an assessment of a reproductive health institution.

How to apply the tool? This tool can be used to evaluate the quality of care of a reproductive health institution from a gender perspective and identify resources and a plan of action to better integrate gender in the institution.

Understanding Maternal Health from a Gender and Rights Perspective.

Khanna, Renu.

2013. Tamil Nadu, India: Commonhealth and Sahaj.
http://bit.ly/1NaNWB8

Authors: Khanna, Renu. Date: 2013

Organization: CommonHealth, SAHAJ, and RUWSEC

URL: http://bit.ly/1NaNWB8

Health Area:

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This four-day module can be used to build staff’s skills and capacities to approach maternal health programming through a gender perspective. The training module is broken up into 12 sections outlined below. Through this tool, facilitators can provide greater clarity on how to incorporate a gender perspective into policies and maternal health program. The topics include Section 1: Overview of Maternal Health, Globally and in India (p.4-5); Section 2: The Concept of Maternal Health (p. 6-8) ; Section 3: Gender Issues in Maternal Health (p.9-42); Section 4: Maternal Health as a Human Rights Issue (p. 44-47); Section 5: Maternal Deaths and their Measurements (p. 48-50); Section 6: Prevention of Maternal Deaths -1 (p. 53-55); Section 7: Prevention of Maternal Deaths -2: Emergency Obstetric Care (p. 56-61); Section 8: Prevention of Maternal Death – 3: Importance of ANC and PNC (p. 63-64); Section 9: Maternal Morbidities as a Maternal Health Issue (p. 65-68); Section 10: Abortion as a Maternal Health Issue (p. 65-67); Section 11: Maternal Health Policy in India (p. 76-79); and Section 12: Addressing Maternal Health from a Gender and Rights Perspective (p. 80-96). On page two, a schedule for the sessions outlines the learning objectives for each session, methodology outlining the learning objectives for each session, methodology, and the amount of time required.

Targeted Users: Mid-level managers of maternal health programs.

How to apply the tool? This tool can be used for training mid-level managers on ways to integrate gender into their programming.

‘Men-streaming’ gender in sexual and reproductive health & HIV/AIDS: A toolkit for development policy makers.

International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), Western Hemisphere Region.

2008. New York: IPPF/WRO.
http://bit.ly/1jmgbVH

Authors: International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), Western Hemisphere Region. Date: 2008

Organization: International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), Western Hemisphere Region.

URL: http://bit.ly/1jmgbVH

Health Area: HIV

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This tool is designed to assist organizations developing policies promoting men’s engagement in improving their own, women’s, and children’s sexual and reproductive health. It includes three parts. The first section reviews the rationale for engaging men and boys in sexual and reproductive health and HIV/AIDS policies (p.4-9). The second part, the toolkit (p. 10- 32), includes six modules on developing policies on engaging men in sexual and reproductive health and HIV/AIDS, including Module A: Understanding the policy context; Module B: Institutional commitment; Module C: Developing a policy statement: engaging men and boys; Module D: Reviewing existing policies; Module E: Working with stakeholders; and Module F: Making policy work in practice. Lastly, the annexes review International Planned Parenthood Federation’s policies, a glossary of terms, and a case study on male involvement in sexual and reproductive health programs.

Targeted Users: For organizational staff responsible for developing organizational policy on men’s engagement in sexual and reproductive health and AIDS.

How to apply the tool? This tool can be used to review existing policies, develop new policies, or include men in existing policies focusing on sexual and reproductive health and HIV/AIDS.

Authors: International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region. Date: 2000

Organization: International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region.

URL: http://bit.ly/1lkoToG

Health Area: Reproductive health/FP

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This manual will assist reproductive health institutions to evaluate the quality of care of their services from a gender perspective. This manual provides guidance on assessing the level of gender integration in the institution, identify ways to better integrate gender into the institutions, and build staff’s capacity to use a gender perspective in their delivery of reproductive health services. This manual can be used to identify the extent to which gender is integrated into the system and then develop a plan of action to better integrate gender into identified areas. The annexes of this manual includes six tools: 1) a client exit interview guide; 2) a service provider interview guide; 3) a service provider document review guide; and guides for 4) observation of physical aspects of the clinic; 5) client reception; and 6) consultation and counseling. Annex 8 includes a list of indicators that can be used to assess the quality of care in a reproductive health institution from a gender perspective.

Targeted Users: Evaluation teams can use this manual to conduct an assessment of a reproductive health institution.

How to apply the tool? This tool can be used to evaluate the quality of care of a reproductive health institution from a gender perspective and identify resources and a plan of action to better integrate gender in the institution.

Authors: Khanna, Renu. Date: 2013

Organization: CommonHealth, SAHAJ, and RUWSEC

URL: http://bit.ly/1NaNWB8

Health Area:

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This four-day module can be used to build staff’s skills and capacities to approach maternal health programming through a gender perspective. The training module is broken up into 12 sections outlined below. Through this tool, facilitators can provide greater clarity on how to incorporate a gender perspective into policies and maternal health program. The topics include Section 1: Overview of Maternal Health, Globally and in India (p.4-5); Section 2: The Concept of Maternal Health (p. 6-8) ; Section 3: Gender Issues in Maternal Health (p.9-42); Section 4: Maternal Health as a Human Rights Issue (p. 44-47); Section 5: Maternal Deaths and their Measurements (p. 48-50); Section 6: Prevention of Maternal Deaths -1 (p. 53-55); Section 7: Prevention of Maternal Deaths -2: Emergency Obstetric Care (p. 56-61); Section 8: Prevention of Maternal Death – 3: Importance of ANC and PNC (p. 63-64); Section 9: Maternal Morbidities as a Maternal Health Issue (p. 65-68); Section 10: Abortion as a Maternal Health Issue (p. 65-67); Section 11: Maternal Health Policy in India (p. 76-79); and Section 12: Addressing Maternal Health from a Gender and Rights Perspective (p. 80-96). On page two, a schedule for the sessions outlines the learning objectives for each session, methodology outlining the learning objectives for each session, methodology, and the amount of time required.

Targeted Users: Mid-level managers of maternal health programs.

How to apply the tool? This tool can be used for training mid-level managers on ways to integrate gender into their programming.

Authors: International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), Western Hemisphere Region. Date: 2008

Organization: International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), Western Hemisphere Region.

URL: http://bit.ly/1jmgbVH

Health Area: HIV

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This tool is designed to assist organizations developing policies promoting men’s engagement in improving their own, women’s, and children’s sexual and reproductive health. It includes three parts. The first section reviews the rationale for engaging men and boys in sexual and reproductive health and HIV/AIDS policies (p.4-9). The second part, the toolkit (p. 10- 32), includes six modules on developing policies on engaging men in sexual and reproductive health and HIV/AIDS, including Module A: Understanding the policy context; Module B: Institutional commitment; Module C: Developing a policy statement: engaging men and boys; Module D: Reviewing existing policies; Module E: Working with stakeholders; and Module F: Making policy work in practice. Lastly, the annexes review International Planned Parenthood Federation’s policies, a glossary of terms, and a case study on male involvement in sexual and reproductive health programs.

Targeted Users: For organizational staff responsible for developing organizational policy on men’s engagement in sexual and reproductive health and AIDS.

How to apply the tool? This tool can be used to review existing policies, develop new policies, or include men in existing policies focusing on sexual and reproductive health and HIV/AIDS.

Report on the Society for Family Health Gender Assessment.

Newman, Constance, M. Mwanamwenge, and K. Peterson.

2013. Chapel Hill, NC: IntraHealth International.
http://bit.ly/1TgVNCl

Authors: Newman, Constance, M. Mwanamwenge, and K. Peterson. Date: 2013

Organization: IntraHealth International

URL: http://bit.ly/1TgVNCl

Health Area: Reproductive health with a focus on human resources

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This resource is an adaptation of InterAction’s Gender Audit Tool for health care facilities
(http://bit.ly/1Zvn0YP). The body of the report presents findings of a gender audit conducted at the Society for Family Health in Zambia. Appendix A includes the data collection instruments, including a questionnaire for a survey and guides for focus group discussions. It also includes instructions for the facilitators and note takers on how to conduct the focus groups, informed consent forms for the focus group discussion participants, and surveys.

Targeted Users: M&E staff, researchers, and gender advisors.

How to apply the tool? These tools, along with the InterAction Gender Audit Manual, can be used by anyone who is interested in conducting a gender audit of their organization. The body of the report provides an example of a completed audit and how to present the findings, analysis, and recommendations.

Nigeria: Access to Health Care for People Living with HIV and AIDS.

Reis, Chen.

2006. New York: Physicians for Human Rights in Coordination with Futures Group International/POLICY Project and Center for the Right to Health.
http://bit.ly/1Xu6Ys1

Authors: Reis, Chen. Date: 2006

Organization: Physicians for Human Rights in coordination with Futures Group (USAID Policy Project)

URL: http://bit.ly/1Xu6Ys1

Health Area: HIV

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This is a report based on three surveys 1) of health care providers, 2) about the health facility, and 3) of people living with HIV/AIDS, all of which are available in the annex. The survey of health care providers included questions on respondent demographics, practices on informed consent, testing, disclosure of HIV status, treatment and care of people living with HIV, and attitudes and beliefs about treatment treatment and care of male and female HIV/AIDS patients. A separate survey instrument was used to assess each facility’s capacity, resources, and policies from the person in charge of the facility.
The men and women living with HIV/AIDS survey included questions on respondent demographics, experiences regarding informed consent, testing, and disclosure, treatment and care, and attitudes and beliefs about treatment and care. Treatment and care practices of HIV/AIDS patients used Likert-type scales (e.g. always, most of the time, sometimes, rarely, never). Questions on attitudes and beliefs were probed by a response of “agree” or “disagree” to statements about testing, treatment, and care of HIV/AIDS patients and perceptions of gender roles and women’s rights. It is possible to disaggregate by sex the data from both the health care provider and person living with HIV (PLHIV) surveys. In addition, there are gender-specific questions on both the providers and persons’ living with HIV/AIDS questionnaires.

Targeted Users: For organizational staff responsible for developing organizational policy on men’s engagement in sexual and reproductive health and AIDS.

How to apply the tool? This tool can be used to examine differential treatment and attitudes toward men and women seeking HIV services. It has the advantage of providing information from both the providers and users’ perspectives and examines gender issues with regard to HIV status disclosure, premarital testing, women’s decision-making, and women’s legal rights.

Health Workers for Change: A Manual to Improve Quality of Care.

World Health Organization.

1995. Geneva: World Health Organization. International/POLICY Project and Center for the Right to Health.
http://bit.ly/1Xu6Ys1

Authors: World Health Organization. Date: 1995

Organization: World Health Organization.

URL: http://bit.ly/1Xu6Ys1

Health Area: Women’s health

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This manual is a facilitation guide for a series of six workshops designed to help health workers examine the way they relate to women and clients and the factors that influence this relationship. It uses participatory methods to help health workers themselves identify causes for the way they relate to clients and ways to improve their interaction and support for clients, both through improving their own job satisfaction and the quality of services.

Targeted Users: The manual is intended for health managers to use with health workers through the guidance of a trained and experienced facilitator to improve services. Researchers may also use the manual to gather information about how health workers and clients relate.

How to apply the tool? The tool is broken into three parts. Part 1 gives an overview to allow one to decide whether it is appropriate to meet the needs of the user. Parts 2 and 3 give a step-by-step guide on how to organize the workshops.

Authors: Newman, Constance, M. Mwanamwenge, and K. Peterson. Date: 2013

Organization: IntraHealth International

URL: http://bit.ly/1TgVNCl

Health Area: Reproductive health with a focus on human resources

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This resource is an adaptation of InterAction’s Gender Audit Tool for health care facilities
(http://bit.ly/1Zvn0YP). The body of the report presents findings of a gender audit conducted at the Society for Family Health in Zambia. Appendix A includes the data collection instruments, including a questionnaire for a survey and guides for focus group discussions. It also includes instructions for the facilitators and note takers on how to conduct the focus groups, informed consent forms for the focus group discussion participants, and surveys.

Targeted Users: M&E staff, researchers, and gender advisors.

How to apply the tool? These tools, along with the InterAction Gender Audit Manual, can be used by anyone who is interested in conducting a gender audit of their organization. The body of the report provides an example of a completed audit and how to present the findings, analysis, and recommendations.

Authors: Reis, Chen. Date: 2006

Organization: Physicians for Human Rights in coordination with Futures Group (USAID Policy Project)

URL: http://bit.ly/1Xu6Ys1

Health Area: HIV

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This is a report based on three surveys 1) of health care providers, 2) about the health facility, and 3) of people living with HIV/AIDS, all of which are available in the annex. The survey of health care providers included questions on respondent demographics, practices on informed consent, testing, disclosure of HIV status, treatment and care of people living with HIV, and attitudes and beliefs about treatment treatment and care of male and female HIV/AIDS patients. A separate survey instrument was used to assess each facility’s capacity, resources, and policies from the person in charge of the facility.
The men and women living with HIV/AIDS survey included questions on respondent demographics, experiences regarding informed consent, testing, and disclosure, treatment and care, and attitudes and beliefs about treatment and care. Treatment and care practices of HIV/AIDS patients used Likert-type scales (e.g. always, most of the time, sometimes, rarely, never). Questions on attitudes and beliefs were probed by a response of “agree” or “disagree” to statements about testing, treatment, and care of HIV/AIDS patients and perceptions of gender roles and women’s rights. It is possible to disaggregate by sex the data from both the health care provider and person living with HIV (PLHIV) surveys. In addition, there are gender-specific questions on both the providers and persons’ living with HIV/AIDS questionnaires.

Targeted Users: For organizational staff responsible for developing organizational policy on men’s engagement in sexual and reproductive health and AIDS.

How to apply the tool? This tool can be used to examine differential treatment and attitudes toward men and women seeking HIV services. It has the advantage of providing information from both the providers and users’ perspectives and examines gender issues with regard to HIV status disclosure, premarital testing, women’s decision-making, and women’s legal rights.

Authors: World Health Organization. Date: 1995

Organization: World Health Organization.

URL: http://bit.ly/1Xu6Ys1

Health Area: Women’s health

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This manual is a facilitation guide for a series of six workshops designed to help health workers examine the way they relate to women and clients and the factors that influence this relationship. It uses participatory methods to help health workers themselves identify causes for the way they relate to clients and ways to improve their interaction and support for clients, both through improving their own job satisfaction and the quality of services.

Targeted Users: The manual is intended for health managers to use with health workers through the guidance of a trained and experienced facilitator to improve services. Researchers may also use the manual to gather information about how health workers and clients relate.

How to apply the tool? The tool is broken into three parts. Part 1 gives an overview to allow one to decide whether it is appropriate to meet the needs of the user. Parts 2 and 3 give a step-by-step guide on how to organize the workshops.

Reference Guides: For Health Care Organizations Seeking Accreditation for High-Quality, Gender-Sensitive Reproductive Health Services.

Michau, Lori et al.

2009. New York: Population Council. Manual: http://bit.ly/1LCs8gH Appendixes:
http://bit.ly/1MGBLz0

Authors: Michau, Lori et al. Date: 2009

Organization: Population Council and PROCOSI

URL: http://bit.ly/1MGBLz0

Health Area: Reproductive health and FP

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This reference guide provides guidance on how to implement high quality, gender-sensitive standards in health care organizations and nongovernmental organizations’ member clinics and administrative centers through a process developed by PROCOSI. The guide includes four different guides focused on the formal certification process. The procedures guide contains information on strategy behind certification (p. 1-13). The self-training guide can be used by staff to build their capacity to understand definitions and concepts and comply with them (p.14-65). The assessment guide outlines steps in the assessment process (p. 66-83). Lastly, the costing guide outlines a methodology for analyzing the costs of integrating a gender perspective into system standards (p.84-108). The appendices include useful tools assessment tools such as a survey guide, an interview guide, and costing guides.

Targeted Users: Health care organizations and nongovernmental organization member clinics implementing gender-sensitive standards in member clinics and administrative centers to achieve certification.

How to apply the tool? This tool can be used to evaluate gender-sensitive standards in clinics and administrative centers. This approach can be adjusted by the evaluators to meet their specific needs.

Authors: Michau, Lori et al. Date: 2009

Organization: Population Council and PROCOSI

URL: http://bit.ly/1MGBLz0

Health Area: Reproductive health and FP

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This reference guide provides guidance on how to implement high quality, gender-sensitive standards in health care organizations and nongovernmental organizations’ member clinics and administrative centers through a process developed by PROCOSI. The guide includes four different guides focused on the formal certification process. The procedures guide contains information on strategy behind certification (p. 1-13). The self-training guide can be used by staff to build their capacity to understand definitions and concepts and comply with them (p.14-65). The assessment guide outlines steps in the assessment process (p. 66-83). Lastly, the costing guide outlines a methodology for analyzing the costs of integrating a gender perspective into system standards (p.84-108). The appendices include useful tools assessment tools such as a survey guide, an interview guide, and costing guides.

Targeted Users: Health care organizations and nongovernmental organization member clinics implementing gender-sensitive standards in member clinics and administrative centers to achieve certification.

How to apply the tool? This tool can be used to evaluate gender-sensitive standards in clinics and administrative centers. This approach can be adjusted by the evaluators to meet their specific needs.