Illustrative General Questions At
The National Level (policies, Resources, and Systems)

Access To and
Control Over Assets

  1. Proportionately, how do health budgets for programs, drugs, supplies, infrastructure and human resources benefit men vs. women?
  2. Who decides how these resources are allocated?

Beliefs and Perceptions
(Norm)

  1. Is political leadership committed to gender equality in the health system?
  2. Do national health leaders understand their legal and political obligations for responding to women’s health issues? Men’s health issues? GBV?

Practices and Participation
(Roles & Responsibilities)

  1. Are proposed health reforms and new policies assessed for their potential differential impact on men and women, and on male and female health workers? How?
  2. Are national budgets for health assessed for whether they are gender equitable?
  3. How does the design of health research take into consideration:
    • Differential risks and vulnerabilities of men and women?
    • Differential biological and social impacts of disease on men and women?
    • Involvement of men and women in treatment and control groups in research studies?
  4. How is the health system leadership accountable for implementing existing gender equality policies? Do they conduct periodic assessments, issue reports, or measure performance on a regular basis?

Laws, Policies,
and Institutions

  1. Does the country have policies on gender equality and are any of them specific to health?
  2. Is health information disaggregated by sex?
  3. Are statistics on the health workforce sdisaggregated both by sex and type of professional? (nurse, doctor, etc.)
  4. Are there national gender equality in health indicators, such as for age of marriage, GBV; son preference?
Illustrative General Specific To
Gender- Based Violence At The National/policy Level

Access To and
Control Over Assets

  1. What kind of health, legal, and social services are available to Gender-Based Violence (GBV) survivors?
  2. Who has access to these services and who does not?
  3. Have health care providers had access to GBV pre-service training? In-service training? Have providers been trained on how to:
    • Screen for GBV?
    • Detect GBV?
    • Provide counseling?
    • Conduct safety planning and referrals?
    • Perform forensic exams?
  4. Do woman throughout the country have local access to health services with rape kits, post-exposure prophylaxis and emergency contraception?
  5. Have health care providers had access to GBV pre-service training? In-service training?
  6. What is the budget for GBV services?
  7. What is the budget for GBV monitoring?
  8. What is the budget for GBV prevention?

Beliefs and Perceptions
(Norm)

  1. Is GBV regarded as a public health problem?
  2. Which forms of GBV are considered health problems?
  3. Is GBV considered a private matter?
  4. Is GBV considered a multi-sectoral issue?

Practices and Participation
(Roles & Responsibilities)

  1. Where are programs for survivors located? In cities? In rural areas?
  2. Where are programs for perpetrators located? In cities? In rural areas?
  3. How many complaints of health care workplace sexual harassment and assault have been reported? What percentage has reached the attention of a supervisor? The health center or hospital administrator? The district health administrator? National attention? What percentage has been adjudicated?
  4. What percentage of sexual violence cases reported to health facilities have been properly referred?
  5. What percentage of sexual violence cases that have been adjudicated have resulted in the prosecution of the perpetrator?
  6. Has the Ministry of Health (MOH) commited to ending GBV, and how public are those

Laws, Policies,
and Institutions

  1. Does the MOH have policies on gender equality?
  2. Does the MOH have policies and protocols and referral procedures on intimate partner violence, sexual violence or other forms of GBV history and intake (e.g., regarding Post-Exposure Prophylaxis and emergency contraception)?
  3. Are there GBV indicators in the health management information system and are data disaggregated by sex?
  4. Are there national gender equality in health indicators, such as age of marriage, GBV, son preference?
  5. What policies exist for prevention and response to sexual harassment and assault in health facilities? What are the procedures for someone to le a complaint? Are policies enforced? How?
  6. What laws/policies de ne GBV? Is rape illegal? How is rape de ned? Is there such a thing as marital rape in the law? Is domestic violence illegal? How is it de ned?
  7. Does the law recognize GBV against women, men and other gender identities?
Next Section: Contraints Analysis >

Resources

Tool Kit on Gender Equality Results and Indicators.

Juliet Hunt

2013. Manila, Philippines: Asian Development Bank and AusAID.
http://bit.ly/1MGSF0q

Authors: Juliet Hunt Date: 2013

Organization: Asian Development Bank and Australian AID.

URL: http://bit.ly/1MGSF0q

Health Area: Multi-sectoral

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This tool is intended as a reference manual for the formulation of gender sensitive or responsive indicators. It is multi-sectoral covering the sectors of health, education, energy, environment, finance and enterprise development, humanitarian response, law and justice, gender-based violence, public sector management and reform, rural development, agriculture and food security, urban development, WASH, and transport.

Targeted Users: Development practitioners and policymakers.

How to apply the tool? The tool aims to improve national M&E of gender integration. The chapter on health provides indicators to measure gender equality in human capital, economic empowerment related to employment in health care, voice and rights, and capacity-building. Users can consult the illustrative indicators and apply or adapt them as appropriate. It is an especially useful resource for those undertaking multi-sectoral gender integration activities.

Taking the Pulse of Policy: The Policy Implementation Assessment Tool.

Bhuyan, A., A. Jorgensen, and S. Sharma.

2010. Washington, DC: Futures Group for USAID.
http://bit.ly/1YwOWaX

Authors: Bhuyan, A., A. Jorgensen, and S. Sharma. Date: 2010

Organization: Futures Group

URL: http://bit.ly/1YwOWaX

Health Area: General

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The purpose of the tool is to help government civil society advocates to “take the pulse” of policies in their appropriate areas, given the issues to be addressed.

Targeted Users: Government and civil society advocates

How to apply the tool? The tool is applied through a step-by-step approach, which typically takes about four to six months: (1) select the policy; (2) form a core country team; (3) make decisions about study parameters; (4) adapt the interview guides; (5) identify interviewees and/or focus group discussion participants; (6) conduct the interviews/focus group discussions; (7) analyze data; and (8) share findings and discuss next steps.

Compendium of Gender Equality and HIV Indicators.

Bloom, Shelah and Svetlana Negroustoueva.

2013. Chapel Hill, NC: Measure Evaluation.
http://bit.ly/1MUnJaP

Authors: Bloom, Shelah and Svetlana Negroustoueva. Date: 2013

Organization: Carolina Population Center/PEPFAR, UNAIDS, USAID, UN Women

URL: http://bit.ly/1MUnJaP

Health Area: HIV/AIDS

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The Compendium provides a menu of M&E indicators to be used by program managers, organizations, and policy-makers to measure gender equality and HIV/AIDS outcomes. It provides relevant indicators for use at different levels of programming and measurement from individual to population level measurement. The tool provides an approximate determinants framework that is used for organizing the indicators into five groups: societal context, intervention programs, populations warranting special attention, behavior and knowledge, and disease prevalence/reproductive health.

Targeted Users: Researchers, program planners and managers, and M&E professionals .

How to apply the tool? The tool is a resource for identifying gender relevant indicators. It can be used in the context of designing M&E plans or to identify what kind of information is important to collect for a gender analysis or baseline and endline studies.

Authors: Juliet Hunt Date: 2013

Organization: Asian Development Bank and Australian AID.

URL: http://bit.ly/1MGSF0q

Health Area: Multi-sectoral

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This tool is intended as a reference manual for the formulation of gender sensitive or responsive indicators. It is multi-sectoral covering the sectors of health, education, energy, environment, finance and enterprise development, humanitarian response, law and justice, gender-based violence, public sector management and reform, rural development, agriculture and food security, urban development, WASH, and transport.

Targeted Users: Development practitioners and policymakers.

How to apply the tool? The tool aims to improve national M&E of gender integration. The chapter on health provides indicators to measure gender equality in human capital, economic empowerment related to employment in health care, voice and rights, and capacity-building. Users can consult the illustrative indicators and apply or adapt them as appropriate. It is an especially useful resource for those undertaking multi-sectoral gender integration activities.

Authors: Bhuyan, A., A. Jorgensen, and S. Sharma. Date: 2010

Organization: Futures Group

URL: http://bit.ly/1YwOWaX

Health Area: General

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The purpose of the tool is to help government civil society advocates to “take the pulse” of policies in their appropriate areas, given the issues to be addressed.

Targeted Users: Government and civil society advocates

How to apply the tool? The tool is applied through a step-by-step approach, which typically takes about four to six months: (1) select the policy; (2) form a core country team; (3) make decisions about study parameters; (4) adapt the interview guides; (5) identify interviewees and/or focus group discussion participants; (6) conduct the interviews/focus group discussions; (7) analyze data; and (8) share findings and discuss next steps.

Authors: Bloom, Shelah and Svetlana Negroustoueva. Date: 2013

Organization: Carolina Population Center/PEPFAR, UNAIDS, USAID, UN Women

URL: http://bit.ly/1MUnJaP

Health Area: HIV/AIDS

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The Compendium provides a menu of M&E indicators to be used by program managers, organizations, and policy-makers to measure gender equality and HIV/AIDS outcomes. It provides relevant indicators for use at different levels of programming and measurement from individual to population level measurement. The tool provides an approximate determinants framework that is used for organizing the indicators into five groups: societal context, intervention programs, populations warranting special attention, behavior and knowledge, and disease prevalence/reproductive health.

Targeted Users: Researchers, program planners and managers, and M&E professionals .

How to apply the tool? The tool is a resource for identifying gender relevant indicators. It can be used in the context of designing M&E plans or to identify what kind of information is important to collect for a gender analysis or baseline and endline studies.

Violence against Women and Girls: A Compendium of M&E Indicators.

Bloom, Shelah.

2008. Washington, DC: Population Reference Bureau and Carolina Population Center.
http://bit.ly/1Idsfo6

Authors: Bloom, Shelah. Date: 2008

Organization: Population Reference Bureau and Carolina Population Center

URL: http://bit.ly/1Idsfo6

Health Area: Gender-based violence with a focus on violence against women

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The guide is a compendium of indicators intended to contribute to improved M&E of violence against women and girls in USAID health programs. The indicators have been designed to be used by people who need information obtained through quantitative methods on program performance at the community, regional, and national levels. All the indicators presented in the compendium conform to technical and ethical standards. The indicators are organized in four chapters, where each indicator is described and explained. The chapters cover indicators that measure: 1) Magnitude and characteristics of different forms of violence against women and girls; 2) Programs addressing violence against women and girls by sector; 3) Under-documented forms of violence against women and girls and emerging areas; and 4) Programs addressing the prevention of violence against women and girls.

Targeted Users: Researchers, program planners and managers, and M&E professionals.

How to apply the tool? The tool can be used to identify indicators on violence against women and girls and to guide the type of information to be included on violence against women and girls in gender analysis.

Gender Assessment Tool: Towards a Gender Transformative HIV Response.

Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS).

2014. Geneva: UNAIDS.
http://bit.ly/1kVYcHp

Authors: Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). Date: 2014

Organization: Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS).

URL: http://bit.ly/1kVYcHp

Health Area: HIV/AIDS and TB

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This tool is designed to support countries’ assessment of gender issues that affect and are affected by their HIV epidemic, context, and response. The tool was developed to formulate or review national strategic plans and to support development of requests for funding from Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. It is also intended to serve the gender analysis requirements of other stakeholders, such as those involved in the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) programming.

Targeted Users: Policymakers and planners in ministries of health, donors, and implementing partners

How to apply the tool? The tool provides a step-by-step approach, with instructions on how to prepare for a gender analysis and where to find relevant documents to review (Stage 1). In Stage 2, the tool provides guiding questions appropriate to different types of stakeholders. Stage 3 provides questions for assessing the policy context, and Stage 4 provides a framework for analysis of the data collected. The annexes provide a list of additional resources and model scopes of work for conducting a gender assessment.

Guide for the Formulation of Public Budgets in the Health Sector Using a Gender Perspective.

Perez Fragoso, Lucia and Rosalio L Rangel Granados.

2004. Mexico City: Ministry of Health. http://bit.ly/1Hr4skw
http://bit.ly/1Hr4skw

Authors: Perez Fragoso, Lucia and Rosalio L Rangel Granados. Date: 2004

Organization: UN WOMEN

URL: http://bit.ly/1Hr4skw

Health Area: General

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The purpose of this tool is to guide ministries of health through a process to incorporate a gender equality perspective in their programming and budgets. The tool includes a series of gender-focused questions to facilitate policymakers and planners’ reflections and actions on the allocation of health resources in a gender equitable manner. The tool offers a comprehensive explanation of what a gender budgeting process is and how to do it. The tool was developed by a team in Mexico that undertook the entire process there.

Targeted Users: Policymakers and planners in ministries of health, planning, and finance. It can also be used by donors to examine their own budget allocations. This is an essential and valuable tool for anyone who works on health financing and program planning and design.

How to apply the tool? Application is most useful when starting a new strategy to develop an accompanying gender equitable budget but can also be applied yearly as a monitoring and re-planning tool.

Authors: Bloom, Shelah. Date: 2008

Organization: Population Reference Bureau and Carolina Population Center

URL: http://bit.ly/1Idsfo6

Health Area: Gender-based violence with a focus on violence against women

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The guide is a compendium of indicators intended to contribute to improved M&E of violence against women and girls in USAID health programs. The indicators have been designed to be used by people who need information obtained through quantitative methods on program performance at the community, regional, and national levels. All the indicators presented in the compendium conform to technical and ethical standards. The indicators are organized in four chapters, where each indicator is described and explained. The chapters cover indicators that measure: 1) Magnitude and characteristics of different forms of violence against women and girls; 2) Programs addressing violence against women and girls by sector; 3) Under-documented forms of violence against women and girls and emerging areas; and 4) Programs addressing the prevention of violence against women and girls.

Targeted Users: Researchers, program planners and managers, and M&E professionals.

How to apply the tool? The tool can be used to identify indicators on violence against women and girls and to guide the type of information to be included on violence against women and girls in gender analysis.

Authors: Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). Date: 2014

Organization: Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS).

URL: http://bit.ly/1kVYcHp

Health Area: HIV/AIDS and TB

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This tool is designed to support countries’ assessment of gender issues that affect and are affected by their HIV epidemic, context, and response. The tool was developed to formulate or review national strategic plans and to support development of requests for funding from Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. It is also intended to serve the gender analysis requirements of other stakeholders, such as those involved in the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) programming.

Targeted Users: Policymakers and planners in ministries of health, donors, and implementing partners

How to apply the tool? The tool provides a step-by-step approach, with instructions on how to prepare for a gender analysis and where to find relevant documents to review (Stage 1). In Stage 2, the tool provides guiding questions appropriate to different types of stakeholders. Stage 3 provides questions for assessing the policy context, and Stage 4 provides a framework for analysis of the data collected. The annexes provide a list of additional resources and model scopes of work for conducting a gender assessment.

Authors: Perez Fragoso, Lucia and Rosalio L Rangel Granados. Date: 2004

Organization: UN WOMEN

URL: http://bit.ly/1Hr4skw

Health Area: General

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The purpose of this tool is to guide ministries of health through a process to incorporate a gender equality perspective in their programming and budgets. The tool includes a series of gender-focused questions to facilitate policymakers and planners’ reflections and actions on the allocation of health resources in a gender equitable manner. The tool offers a comprehensive explanation of what a gender budgeting process is and how to do it. The tool was developed by a team in Mexico that undertook the entire process there.

Targeted Users: Policymakers and planners in ministries of health, planning, and finance. It can also be used by donors to examine their own budget allocations. This is an essential and valuable tool for anyone who works on health financing and program planning and design.

How to apply the tool? Application is most useful when starting a new strategy to develop an accompanying gender equitable budget but can also be applied yearly as a monitoring and re-planning tool.

Policy Report: Zambia: Engaging Men in HIV and GBV Prevention, SRHR Promotion and Parenting.

Sonke Gender Justice.

2012. Cape Town, South Africa: Sonke Gender Justice.
http://bit.ly/1OjmRkt

Authors: Sonke Gender Justice. Date: 2012

Organization: Sonke Gender Justice.

URL: http://bit.ly/1OjmRkt

Health Area: HIV/AIDS, gender-based violence, and reproductive and sexual health

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This is one of several reports based on the application of a policy tool. The policy tool is contained in each report (in the Zambia report it appears on page four). The tool provides a practical framework for conducting an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of policies, laws, and plans supportive of the engagement of men and boys in four areas related to gender equality: HIV/AIDS; gender-based violence; sexual and reproductive health and rights; and parenting.

Targeted Users: Policymakers and planners in ministries of health and advocates for policy change.

How to apply the tool? The tool uses a four-point scale to assess the enabling environment: satisfactory, room for improvement, inadequate, and relevant documents not available. These criteria are applied to each of the four areas of HIV/AIDS: gender-based violence; sexual and reproductive health and rights; and parenting.

Gender-Sensitive Indicators for Media.

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

2012. Paris: UNESCO.
http://bit.ly/1OufPHU

Authors: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). Date: 2012

Organization: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

URL: http://bit.ly/1OufPHU

Health Area: General

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The Gender-Sensitive Indicators for Media examines the intersection between women’s empowerment and media development. The gender indicators presented provide guidance on how to monitor the gender-responsiveness of their organizations and activities. Indicators are listed under two categories: A) Actions to foster gender equality within media organizations and B) Gender portrayal in media content. Section A includes indicators for 1) Gender balance at the decision-making level (p. 22-23); 2) Gender equality in work and working conditions (p. 24-28) ; 3) Gender equality in unions, associations, clubs, and organizations of journalists, other media professionals, and media self-regulatory bodies (p. 29-32); 4) Media organizations’ promotion of ethical codes and policies in favor of gender equality in media content (p. 33-34); and 5) Gender balance in education and training (p. 35-38). Section B includes indicators on 1) Balanced portrayal of men and women in news and current affairs (p. 40-46) and 2) Fair portrayal of women and men in commercial messages in the media in advertising (p. 47-48). A gender glossary is also available on page 53. This tool is linked to Media Development Indicators available here:
http://bit.ly/1OufPHU

Targeted Users: Citizen media groups and organizations using media in development interventions.

How to apply the tool? Organizations using media in their projects can use the indicators presented in the Gender-Sensitive Indicators for Media to measure the gender-responsiveness of their organizations and activities.

Gender-responsive Budgeting in Practice: A Training Manual.

United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM)/United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and Empowerment of Women (UN WOMEN) and United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA).

2006. New York: UNIFEM and UNFPA.
http://bit.ly/1Hr6ukK

Authors: United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM)/United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and Empowerment of Women (UN WOMEN) and United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). Date: 2006

Organization: United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM)/United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and Empowerment of Women (UN WOMEN) and United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA).

URL: http://bit.ly/1Hr6ukK

Health Area: General

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This manual provides an overview of gender-responsive budgeting applied to national budget cycles through five modules that outline key concepts and technical and political aspects of gender-responsive budgeting. Module 1 focuses on key concepts in gender-responsive budgeting (p. 13-15). The second module seeks to enable participants to differentiate between various budget classifications and how to apply a gender lens to those different types of classifications (p. 19-24). Module three provides an overview of Diane Elson’s gender budget analysis tools and how to apply those to tools to develop a gender-responsive budget (p. 29-37). Module four reviews experiences in gender budget initiatives (p. 43-45). The final module examines gender budget initiatives within the government (p. 51-54). The Annexes include an outline of the suggested workshop program, the workshop evaluation form, and a list of the handouts referenced in the various modules (p. 61-65). This publication is available in English, French, and Spanish.

Targeted Users: This manual is aimed at UNFPA and UNIFEM staff and partners who are supporting gender-responsive budgeting at the country level.

How to apply the tool? Facilitators with experience using gender-responsive budgets and doing gender analysis can use this tool to conduct workshops with staff to build their knowledge and skills to use, develop, and understand the applications of gender-responsive budgets.

Authors: Sonke Gender Justice. Date: 2012

Organization: Sonke Gender Justice.

URL: http://bit.ly/1OjmRkt

Health Area: HIV/AIDS, gender-based violence, and reproductive and sexual health

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This is one of several reports based on the application of a policy tool. The policy tool is contained in each report (in the Zambia report it appears on page four). The tool provides a practical framework for conducting an analysis of the strengths and weaknesses of policies, laws, and plans supportive of the engagement of men and boys in four areas related to gender equality: HIV/AIDS; gender-based violence; sexual and reproductive health and rights; and parenting.

Targeted Users: Policymakers and planners in ministries of health and advocates for policy change.

How to apply the tool? The tool uses a four-point scale to assess the enabling environment: satisfactory, room for improvement, inadequate, and relevant documents not available. These criteria are applied to each of the four areas of HIV/AIDS: gender-based violence; sexual and reproductive health and rights; and parenting.

Authors: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). Date: 2012

Organization: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

URL: http://bit.ly/1OufPHU

Health Area: General

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The Gender-Sensitive Indicators for Media examines the intersection between women’s empowerment and media development. The gender indicators presented provide guidance on how to monitor the gender-responsiveness of their organizations and activities. Indicators are listed under two categories: A) Actions to foster gender equality within media organizations and B) Gender portrayal in media content. Section A includes indicators for 1) Gender balance at the decision-making level (p. 22-23); 2) Gender equality in work and working conditions (p. 24-28) ; 3) Gender equality in unions, associations, clubs, and organizations of journalists, other media professionals, and media self-regulatory bodies (p. 29-32); 4) Media organizations’ promotion of ethical codes and policies in favor of gender equality in media content (p. 33-34); and 5) Gender balance in education and training (p. 35-38). Section B includes indicators on 1) Balanced portrayal of men and women in news and current affairs (p. 40-46) and 2) Fair portrayal of women and men in commercial messages in the media in advertising (p. 47-48). A gender glossary is also available on page 53. This tool is linked to Media Development Indicators available here:
http://bit.ly/1OufPHU

Targeted Users: Citizen media groups and organizations using media in development interventions.

How to apply the tool? Organizations using media in their projects can use the indicators presented in the Gender-Sensitive Indicators for Media to measure the gender-responsiveness of their organizations and activities.

Authors: United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM)/United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and Empowerment of Women (UN WOMEN) and United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). Date: 2006

Organization: United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM)/United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and Empowerment of Women (UN WOMEN) and United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA).

URL: http://bit.ly/1Hr6ukK

Health Area: General

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This manual provides an overview of gender-responsive budgeting applied to national budget cycles through five modules that outline key concepts and technical and political aspects of gender-responsive budgeting. Module 1 focuses on key concepts in gender-responsive budgeting (p. 13-15). The second module seeks to enable participants to differentiate between various budget classifications and how to apply a gender lens to those different types of classifications (p. 19-24). Module three provides an overview of Diane Elson’s gender budget analysis tools and how to apply those to tools to develop a gender-responsive budget (p. 29-37). Module four reviews experiences in gender budget initiatives (p. 43-45). The final module examines gender budget initiatives within the government (p. 51-54). The Annexes include an outline of the suggested workshop program, the workshop evaluation form, and a list of the handouts referenced in the various modules (p. 61-65). This publication is available in English, French, and Spanish.

Targeted Users: This manual is aimed at UNFPA and UNIFEM staff and partners who are supporting gender-responsive budgeting at the country level.

How to apply the tool? Facilitators with experience using gender-responsive budgets and doing gender analysis can use this tool to conduct workshops with staff to build their knowledge and skills to use, develop, and understand the applications of gender-responsive budgets.

Human Rights and Gender Equality in Health Sector Strategies: How to Assess Policy Coherence.

World Health Organization.

2001. Geneva: World Health Organization.
http://bit.ly/1lkx0l6

Authors: World Health Organization. Date: 2001

Organization: World Health Organization.

URL: http://bit.ly/1lkx0l6

Health Area: General

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The purpose of the tool is to:
• Assess the extent to which health sector strategies are consistent with and promote human rights standards and principles, including gender equality;

• Identify gender equality and human rights-related gaps and opportunities in national commitments and health sector strategies to facilitate effective, relevant, and strategic health sector interventions; and

• Engage stakeholders in multiple disciplines to address human rights and gender equality in relation to health.

Targeted Users: Ministries of health and other sectors, national human rights institutions, development partners, and civil society organizations

How to apply the tool? The tool offers practical guidance on planning, data collection, analysis, and dissemination for identifying whether gender has been adequately addressed in national policy instruments, particularly health policies. It offers three instruments for assessing:

• A country’s compliance with its obligations and commitments in accord with international treaties, agreements, and consensus documents;

• A country’s fulfillment of its own legal, policy, and institutional frameworks that promote human rights and gender equality; and

• The extent to which principles of human rights and gender equity have been incorporated in national health sector strategies.

Guidelines for gender-based analysis of health data for decision-making

Margaret Haworth-Brockman and Harpa Isfeld

FP and Reproductive Health Indicators Database. 2010
http://bit.ly/1RfVkkX

Authors: Margaret Haworth-Brockman and Harpa Isfeld Date: 2010

Organization: Pan American Health Organization

URL: http://bit.ly/1RfVkkX

Health Area: General

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This tool provides guidance on how to conduct a gender analysis using health surveillance data and data from surveys or other sources to develop, change and improve national and regional health policies, planning and programs. It discusses the use of quantitative and qualitative data for gender analysis and provides case studies to illustrate what can be learned from conducting an analysis of disaggregated by sex data in health to enhance health systems response to men and women’s different health needs.

Targeted Users: Researchers, policymakers, and program managers.

How to apply the tool? This is an excellent place to start when embarking on an analysis of secondary data sources. It demonstrates that gender analysis is built on a series of questions used to query data that are continuously refined to move from identification of sex differences in health risks, vulnerabilities, and outcomes to ascertain contributory factors based on gender.

Gender, Women and Primary Health Care Renewal: A Discussion Paper

World Health Organization

2010 Geneva: World Health Organization. http://bit.ly/1lkx0l6
http://bit.ly/230b54D

Authors: World Health Organization Date: 2010

Organization: World Health Organization

URL: http://bit.ly/230b54D

Health Area: General

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This report features how the World Health Organization has integrated gender into recent primary health care reforms including universal coverage reforms, service delivery reforms, public policy reforms, and leadership reforms. Secondly, it features ways to measure gender equality in the six building blocks of the health system and larger policy reforms. Chapter 1 outlines the primary health care approach, reforms, gender concepts, and a rationale for integrating gender into primary health care (p. 11-17). Chapters 2 (p. 21-42) and 3 (p. 45-60) review the universal coverage reforms, and public and leadership reforms. Chapter 4 (p. 63-67) provides recommendations to the World Health Organization to better integrate gender into policies and programs. A number of key concepts are referenced in boxes throughout the report, notably developing gender-sensitive indicators (p. 47) and applying sex and gender-based analysis in health research.

Targeted Users: Policymakers focused on primary health care.

How to apply the tool? This tool can be used to assist organizations that are integrating gender into primary health care policies.

Authors: World Health Organization. Date: 2001

Organization: World Health Organization.

URL: http://bit.ly/1lkx0l6

Health Area: General

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): The purpose of the tool is to:
• Assess the extent to which health sector strategies are consistent with and promote human rights standards and principles, including gender equality;

• Identify gender equality and human rights-related gaps and opportunities in national commitments and health sector strategies to facilitate effective, relevant, and strategic health sector interventions; and

• Engage stakeholders in multiple disciplines to address human rights and gender equality in relation to health.

Targeted Users: Ministries of health and other sectors, national human rights institutions, development partners, and civil society organizations

How to apply the tool? The tool offers practical guidance on planning, data collection, analysis, and dissemination for identifying whether gender has been adequately addressed in national policy instruments, particularly health policies. It offers three instruments for assessing:

• A country’s compliance with its obligations and commitments in accord with international treaties, agreements, and consensus documents;

• A country’s fulfillment of its own legal, policy, and institutional frameworks that promote human rights and gender equality; and

• The extent to which principles of human rights and gender equity have been incorporated in national health sector strategies.

Authors: Margaret Haworth-Brockman and Harpa Isfeld Date: 2010

Organization: Pan American Health Organization

URL: http://bit.ly/1RfVkkX

Health Area: General

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This tool provides guidance on how to conduct a gender analysis using health surveillance data and data from surveys or other sources to develop, change and improve national and regional health policies, planning and programs. It discusses the use of quantitative and qualitative data for gender analysis and provides case studies to illustrate what can be learned from conducting an analysis of disaggregated by sex data in health to enhance health systems response to men and women’s different health needs.

Targeted Users: Researchers, policymakers, and program managers.

How to apply the tool? This is an excellent place to start when embarking on an analysis of secondary data sources. It demonstrates that gender analysis is built on a series of questions used to query data that are continuously refined to move from identification of sex differences in health risks, vulnerabilities, and outcomes to ascertain contributory factors based on gender.

Authors: World Health Organization Date: 2010

Organization: World Health Organization

URL: http://bit.ly/230b54D

Health Area: General

Tool Objectives (What is this tool designed to help you do?): This report features how the World Health Organization has integrated gender into recent primary health care reforms including universal coverage reforms, service delivery reforms, public policy reforms, and leadership reforms. Secondly, it features ways to measure gender equality in the six building blocks of the health system and larger policy reforms. Chapter 1 outlines the primary health care approach, reforms, gender concepts, and a rationale for integrating gender into primary health care (p. 11-17). Chapters 2 (p. 21-42) and 3 (p. 45-60) review the universal coverage reforms, and public and leadership reforms. Chapter 4 (p. 63-67) provides recommendations to the World Health Organization to better integrate gender into policies and programs. A number of key concepts are referenced in boxes throughout the report, notably developing gender-sensitive indicators (p. 47) and applying sex and gender-based analysis in health research.

Targeted Users: Policymakers focused on primary health care.

How to apply the tool? This tool can be used to assist organizations that are integrating gender into primary health care policies.